Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Brotzeit Bier Bar & Restaurant, VivoCity

Kaesespaetzle

Here's a little something to follow up with on that recent macaroni and cheese discussion: Kaesespaetzle from Brotzeit (1 Harbourfront Walk #01-149, 6272-8815). As the name suggests, it's Spaetzle covered in rich piping hot cheese. I wasn't quite expecting this when I came here, but I was quite happy with it when I left.

Brotzeitflade BayernI was a bit confused about some other items on the menu though, particularly the Brotzeitflade Bayern, which was described as a flatbread with toppings on the menu. It was basically just a pizza. Is this even really German?? (Can anyone verify please?) Well, it was pretty thin, crunchy, and tasty. But I just had pizza the other day, so I wasn't completely happy with my selection. At least the generally positive Kaesespaetzle experience was enough to bring me back to try some of the other items.

9 comments:

Kathy said...

Hey I was told (by a Swedish friend) that it is German and it refers to pizza as this type of dough is often used for pizza base.

Flatbrot evolved from Kebab bread or Lebanese flatbread. It is however not traditional German flatbread. (flatbruo, can't duplicate the exact punctuation here).

They also serve it in Norway.

Anonymous said...

The "Brotzeitfladen" is certainly NOT a traditional bavarian dish. Never seen it in Germany b4, looks more like a Germano-Singaporean concoction

Editrix said...

You should try the sausages, which are excellent. I'd go with the sausage platter if there's 2 of you, and the garlic pork if you're not inclined to share. The beer's excellent, and for dessert, the sacher torte is rich, heavy and just the right sweetness and the "shredded" pancake with rum marinated raisins is stodgily good.

ClearTear said...

apparently they serve the same thing in
Brotzeit - Contemporary German Bier Bar & Restaurant at sentosa, found it in some other pple blog.

Kathy said...

Well French eat loads of pasta and Swedish eat quite abit of rice these days, both which are not traditionally part of their cusine. And curry nights are common in traditional English pubs in the UK.

So it doesn't have to be a traditional Bavarian dish for it to be commonly served in Germany does it?

I'm curious if this dish is found in Germany, or if German families do make something like that at home.

The Brozeit people have said that the bar is modelled after those found in Munich, are there any Germans reading this?

Anonymous said...

Hi,

Just wanted to add that when I was in Munich, I did see fladenbrot being sold at the fairs. So apparently it's quite a popular item.

In addition, my German tutor used to get all excited whenever she could get her hands on some fladenbrot at Carrefour.. apparently she's from the border across fr Alsace-Lorraine (French province w/ loads of Germans) and that's where it originated from...

Thumbs up to the food sampling! You seem to have tried a wider variety of foods from around the island than most Singaporeans.

Anonymous said...

There seems to be a lot of confusion here. "Fladenbrot" is a simple flatbread, usually sold in turkish grocery stores in Germany. It is never decorated with toppings like a pizza. The alsatian dish you refer to is actually called "Flammkuchen", pizza-like, but with a sour cream and bacon topping. A german version made with sliced onions is called "Zwiebelkuchen", but it is not a bavarian dish. FYI, "Brotzeit" is a vernacular bavarian expression for lunch...

Nighty said...

ok let me enlighten you. as some1 allready said the only "pizza-like" dish in germany in general is called zwiebelkuchen and has nothing to do with what you actualy - and its not even bavarian. what you were eating was simply something madeup from the "owners".

to the fladenbrot thing. fladenbrot is NOT exactly something germans love. its a cheap kind of bread that is made by the turk population in germany. fladenbrot has no real taste and is only eatable when fresh. if you leave it for 1-2days it becomes gumlike and tastes like cr*p.

i have NEVER seen any german take fladenbrot and top it with anything. the real use for fladenbrot is with döner. since turks are a quiet big part of the immigrants in germany you find alot of "kebab" stores in germany. i live in berlin and the "normal" döner was introduced in berlin > kreuzberg. good döner(kebab's) use round pide like bread that is speialy designed to be used for the döner-kebab. the cheaper stores simply buy fladenbrot and cut it in 6-8pieces, depending on how big the fladenbrot is. usualy its as big as your forearm from top to bottom and its round.

hope i could give you some infos. if you want i can post pictures :)

Julie said...

Brotzeit. 2 thumbs up!